How the 90s Changed Hip Hop

Sound & Vision
Hosted by Emily Fox

DJ and professor Davey D along with KEXP’s Gabriel Teodros discuss how consolidation and the Telecommunications Act of 1996 hid independent and more conscious hip hop artists from the mainstream eye.


 
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fugees // photo by Paul Natkin

DJ and professor Davey D along with KEXP’s Gabriel Teodros discuss how consolidation and the Telecommunications Act of 1996 drove out small, independent and Black-owned radio stations. The resulting centralized playlists hid more independent and socially conscious hip hop artists from the mainstream eye.

“It’s the same five artists over and over again. What do they talk about? They talk about money, sex and things that are dehumanizing. What does that mean when white America is learning about Black humanity through this very narrow lens that only a few executives that are not from the culture are painting? It becomes an attack,” Teodros says.

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