Nikkita Oliver on Letting the Vision Lead the Movement

Sound & Vision
Hosted by Emily Fox
KEXP’s Gabriel Teodros talks with Nikkita Oliver about the importance of diversity within a movement, the false narrative of the good protester vs. bad protester, and what’s inspiring her during this moment.
photo by alex garland

Most people in Seattle know Nikkita Oliver from her historic mayoral run in 2017. She lost the primary election by less than 2,000 votes. But Oliver is also a musician, a poet, an attorney, and the co-director of an incredible organization called Creative Justice, which works with youth most affected by the school-to-prison pipeline. She’s also been an active organizer in Seattle’s protests and advancing the demands to defund and demilitarize the police.

A few weeks ago, she participated in a 12,000 person march from Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park to city hall where she then livestreamed what was supposed to be a closed door meeting with Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. Oliver laid out demands for the city — defund the police, fund community-based health and safety, and drop all charges against protesters. 

KEXP’s Gabriel Teodros talks with Oliver about the importance of diversity within a movement, the false narrative of the good protester vs. bad protester, and what’s inspiring her during this moment.

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